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This is my first wedding in Singapore. And one of my expressions is the Changi Airport. Singapore Changi Airport is consistently voted the world's best airport in both industry and consumer polls. Among unexpected highlights there's an outdoor nature trail, swimming pool, movie theater, hawker-style food stalls, beauty and reflexology centers, children's play areas, sleeping areas and massage chairs all over the place. If only the flights were delayed more often.

Chili crab was created in 1950 by Singaporean chef Cher Yaw Tian and her husband Lim Choon Ngee. It's since become the unofficial national dish of a food-loving nation. Restaurants and coffee shops serve it by the ton nightly. The runner-up crustacean dish, Singapore's signature black pepper crab, would take center stage anywhere else. When it comes to public services, visitors seldom have to wait. Strict performance targets at the airport, for instance, mean travelers don't have to loiter around the luggage carousel.

The first bag off a wide-body airplane has to be on the carousel in 12 minutes; the last has to arrive within 30 minutes. It just gets quicker from there -- Singapore trains always run on time. It never fails to amuse locals when foreigners try (and fail miserably) to use Singlish, Singapore's own animated colloquial slang. But that doesn't mean visitors shouldn't learn a couple of expressions. When bargaining, you can say: "So expensive! Cheaper can? I no money lah."

Singlish is a blend of the country's many languages and dialects, including the Queen's English, Bahasa Melayu, Tamil, Hokkien, Teochew, Cantonese, Bengali and Punjabi. While some Singaporeans frown on Singlish as an embarrassing crime against grammar, others see it as a colorful and unique expression of the nation's multiculturism. There's L.A., there's the immortal "la la la" song lyric, there's the rock band from Liverpool -- but there's no "lah" like the one in Singapore. The word "lah" can be, and often is, added to the end of any sentence in Singapore.

With no absolute definition of its own, its meaning can change depending on the sentence. Lah can be used to either emphasize a point or soften a command. Or it can be used to save words, by dramatically shortening sentences: "Come on, don't waste anymore time!" becomes simply "Come on, lah." The word is one of the most commonly used in Singlish.

Film by sony a7rii + a7sii + a6500, lens: 28mm f2, 50mm f1.8, all handheld.

Photography by www.hipsterwedding.asia

Thanks for my 2nd shooter Lé Thanh Chì

Check out my Instagram: @jacobweddingfilms

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